Some people, such as Samuel Pepys, have become famous as a diarist. Pepys painted by John Closterman in the 1690s. ... Samuel Pepys, who had an important position at the Admiralty, stayed in London and provided a contemporary account of the plague … Pepys lived at an interesting time (he was alive at the time of the Great Fire of London). Elisabeth de … PEPYS, SAMUEL (1633 – 1703). Rebecca Rideal, author of 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire, shares 10 lesser-known facts about the Great Fire of London. When Pepys became associated with the navy in 1660, the line of battle had consisted of 30 battleships of a total burden of approximately 25,000 tons and carrying 1,730 guns. Samuel Pepys' Diary with information about his life and the 17th century background. Images for kids. Born in London, the son of a tailor, he was educated at a local school and later completed his graduation from the prestigious Cambridge University. Anne Frank wrote a diary while she was hiding from the Nazis. Samuel Pepys painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller in 1689. Samuel Pepys, (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English administrator at the Admiralty and Member of Parliament.He is famous for his diary.. Pepys rose to be the Chief Secretary to the Admiralty under Charles II, and later under James II.Although Pepys had no maritime experience, he rose by patronage, hard work and his talent for administration. When he laid down his office, he left a battle line of 59 ships of a total burden of 66,000 tons and carrying 4,492 guns. Why were they so compelling to read, and what dramatic turn of events brought them to an end? The motto reads "Mens cujusque is est Quisque" – "Mind Makes the Man". We know lots about these two events from his diary. Pepys started his diary in 1660 and went on writing it until 1669. On 5 September 1666, the 33-year-old Samuel Pepys climbed the steeple of the ancient church of All Hallows-by-the-Tower and was met with the “the saddest sight of desolation that I ever saw; everywhere great fires, oyle-cellars, and brimstone, and other things burning”. The Great Plague (1665-1666) was a massive outbreak of disease in England that killed 75,000 to 100,000 people, up to a fifth of London's population. Rebecca Rideal, author of 1666: Plague, War and Hellfire, shares 10 lesser-known facts about the Great Fire of London. Key facts about Samuel Pepys Samuel Pepys was a politician and naval administrator, but is best known for his diary, which covered the period 1660-1669. The Diary has been used as an important source for many of the key events of the 1660s, including the restoration of the monarchy The king/queen and royal family of a country, or a form of government with a king/queen at the head. The upshot is that he left behind many documents detailing the dangers and the pleasures of his life in London. PEPYS, SAMUEL (1633 – 1703), English diarist and politician. His anxiety was well founded, for by the spring of 1665, plague had reached these shores, and in June Pepys wrote, ‘to my great trouble, hear that the plague is come into the City’. The lion proved a good houseguest, being “as tame as you sent him, and as good company”. It destroyed 13,000 houses. Key facts. Samuel Pepys' bookplate. On 5 September 1666, the 33-year-old Samuel Pepys climbed the steeple of the ancient church of All Hallows-by-the-Tower and was met with the “the saddest sight of desolation that I ever saw; everywhere great fires, oyle-cellars, and brimstone, and other things burning”. Samuel Pepys was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament who is most known for the diaries which he wrote from 1660 to 1669. Samuel Pepys, English diarist and naval administrator, celebrated for his Diary (first published in 1825), which gives a fascinating picture of the official and upper-class life of Restoration London from Jan. 1, 1660, to May 31, 1669.

PEPYS, SAMUEL (1633 – 1703). As a powerful naval administrator, he was also a great believer in the merits of official paperwork. We know a lot about what London was like by reading his diary. Discover facts about Samuel Pepys' life and diaries. Pepys wrote back to report that the beast was now living with him at the Admiralty Office in Westminster. Samuel Pepys facts: The English diarist and public official Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) kept a diary that provides a graphic account of English social life and conditions during the early period of the Restoration. Samuel Pepys’s diary of the 1660s provides ample evidence that he enjoyed writing about himself. Samuel Pepys first mentioned the plague in his diary in October 1663 when he recorded a major outbreak in Amsterdam and feared for its spread to England. Pepys Library c1870. PEPYS, SAMUEL (1633 – 1703), English diarist and politician.

He also saw the Great Fire of London in 1666.



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